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How much sleep does a teenager need per night

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Most teens need about 8 to 10 hours of sleep each night. Getting the right amount of sleep is important for anyone who wants to do well on a test or play their best in sports. Unfortunately, many teens don't get enough sleep. Teens often got a bad rap for staying up late, oversleeping for school, and falling asleep in class. But teen sleep patterns are different from those of adults or younger kids. During the teen years, the body's circadian rhythm an internal biological clock is reset, telling a person to fall asleep later and wake up later.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Sleep Tips for Teens Mayo Clinic

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How Much Sleep is Enough?

How Much Sleep Do I Need?

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Wendy Hall does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. Parents worry about whether their teenagers are getting enough sleep. The first thing to understand is that teenagers are still growing and their brains are still developing — so they need more sleep than adults. They also have different sleep-wake rhythms and release melatonin a natural hormone to prepare for sleep later, which means evening sleepiness takes longer to occur and they have a tendency to go to bed later and to sleep later in the morning.

Of course, they still have to rise early for school. Peers also influence teenagers more than they influence younger children. Increased social demands — in the form of online chat, social networking and web browsing — combine with greater academic pressures as children enter high school.

So what are optimal sleep times to support adolescent health? They suggested that those between 13 and 18 years of age should sleep eight to 10 hours per 24 hours on a regular basis to promote optimal health. Unfortunately, worldwide studies show that in 53 per cent of cases teenagers are getting less than eight hours of sleep per night on school days. A recent report indicated that only five per cent of adolescents in the United States meet recommendations for sleep, physical activity and screen time.

Older adolescents were less likely than younger adolescents 14 years or less to achieve the recommendations. A lot of action takes place in teenage brains due to their developmental stage. During adolescence, there are major changes to thinking, emotions, behaviour and interpersonal relationships. Changes to brain connections contribute to improvements in thinking abilities and changes in brain signalling.

Shifts in balance between brain systems create a period where teens may take increased risks or engage in more reward seeking. Teenagers react a lot to stress and their stress-response systems are maturing. Sex hormones affect the neurotransmitters in their brains and increase their reactivity to stress.

When we add inadequate sleep time to the picture there can be many implications. A recent review identified increased risk for suicide, being overweight, high rates of injury, poor sustained attention and low school grades for teens sleeping less than eight hours. Sleeping nine or more hours has, on the other hand, been associated with better life satisfaction, fewer health complaints and better quality family relationships for teens.

Teen drivers sleeping six or less hours per night on weekdays and on weekends reported riskier driving, sensation seeking and greater drug and alcohol intake than those sleeping more than six hours. There is also evidence that teens who sleep for more hours and have better quality sleep have a decreased risk for high blood pressure and cholesterol, insulin resistance and larger waist circumference than teens with shorter sleep times and lower sleep quality.

This is after taking into account other risk factors such as body fat, physical activity, television viewing and diet quality. Parents can work with teens to set bedtimes. They should encourage the use of beds only for sleep and for relaxing before sleeping.

Using electronic technology before bed and during the night increases the risk for shorter sleep time. Parents can support screen downtime before bedtime and through the night by parking phones at a charging pad away from bedrooms.

Parents can also help their teens achieve achieve the recommended eight hours or more of sleep by engaging in relaxing family activities with them in the evening.

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Wendy Hall , University of British Columbia. So how much sleep do adolescents really need and how can parents help them achieve it? Eight to 10 hours, regularly So what are optimal sleep times to support adolescent health? Video games at night are a recipe for disrupted, short or low-quality sleep.

Shutterstock Unfortunately, worldwide studies show that in 53 per cent of cases teenagers are getting less than eight hours of sleep per night on school days. Sex hormones and the stress response A lot of action takes place in teenage brains due to their developmental stage.

Drugs, alcohol and high cholesterol Teen drivers sleeping six or less hours per night on weekdays and on weekends reported riskier driving, sensation seeking and greater drug and alcohol intake than those sleeping more than six hours. Lack of sleep may be associated with greater intake of drugs and alcohol. Park the electronic devices Parents can work with teens to set bedtimes.

A Healthy Sleep Schedule for Teens

Adolescents are notorious for not getting enough sleep. Teenagers do not get enough sleep for a number of reasons:. Shift in sleep schedule. It also means waking 2 hours later in the morning.

Getting teens to bed at a reasonable hour can help them behave and function better during the day. Here's how you can get your adolescent on a healthy sleep schedule.

Back to Sleep and tiredness. The stock library no longer exists. Image was incorporated into the webpage during the subscription term and can be used indefinitely in the same page - subject to thinkstock subscription rules. Having screens in the bedroom also means your teen is more likely to stay up late interacting with friends on social media. Read more about how much exercise teenagers need.

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Governor Hogan announced that health care institutions in Maryland can start performing elective surgical cases in guidance with the State Department of Health. Learn what Johns Hopkins is doing. This makes it more difficult for them to fall asleep before 11 p. Add in early school start times and an increase in homework, extracurricular activities and sometimes a part-time job, and sleep deprivation in teens becomes common. So how much sleep is enough? Additional sleep supports their developing brain, as well as physical growth spurts. Sterni and Crocetti both recommend that parents take teenagers and sleep seriously. Begin by modeling good sleep habits, such as adhering to a regular sleep schedule, cutting back on evening caffeine, and exercising regularly. They also suggest these teen-specific and time-tested tips.

Teenagers and sleep

Victorian government portal for older people, with information about government and community services and programs. Type a minimum of three characters then press UP or DOWN on the keyboard to navigate the autocompleted search results. Sleep research suggests that a teenager needs between eight and 10 hours of sleep every night. This is more than the amount a child or an adult needs. Yet most adolescents only get about 6.

Wendy Hall does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. Parents worry about whether their teenagers are getting enough sleep.

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you are not alone. Many teenagers feel that they are always tired. Sleep helps to fuel your brain and your body.

Teens and sleep: Why you need it and how to get enough

Sleep is food for the brain. During sleep, important body functions and brain activity occur. Skipping sleep can be harmful — even deadly, particularly if you are behind the wheel.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How Much Sleep Does Your Teen Need?

Lack of sleep can make it harder for your child to behave well, regulate emotions, pay attention and do well at school, and get along with others. Being tired all the time can even contribute to mental health issues like anxiety and depression. Most teenagers need hours of sleep each night. Some need as little as 7 hours or as much as 11 hours. This is because they start to secrete melatonin later at night than they did in earlier childhood, which affects their circadian rhythms. Also, as their brains mature during puberty, children can stay awake for longer.

Sleep in Adolescents

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Johns Hopkins experts share how much sleep is enough — and practical ways to help teens do the best they can, because this age group needs more sleep M.D., M.P.H., teens need 9 to 9½ hours of sleep per night—that's an hour or so.

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Comments: 3
  1. Daramar

    What excellent question

  2. Mitaxe

    Very much I regret, that I can help nothing. I hope, to you here will help. Do not despair.

  3. JoJosho

    Earlier I thought differently, thanks for the help in this question.

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